Blogs

Welcome to our blogs, where you can read real-life stories from the families we support.

If you would like to write a blog, we'd love to hear from you. Email web.team@contact.org.uk to find out more.

Please note that the opinions expressed on these blogs are the author's own views and not necessarily those of Contact.

When it comes to rare, collaboration is key

Last week we celebrated the 11thannual Rare Disease Day, which took place with events held around the country to promote awareness of rare conditions. This year's theme was research - and with 7,000 known rare conditions and only 400 with licenced treatments, research is vital. Our Rare Conditions Information Officer, Rachel Gibson, blogs about her experience of the day and gives a fascinating insight into rare developments.

Written by Contact at 14:05

Caring More Than Most: Nikki and Antonia

This week parent carers have been giving evidence at the work and pensions select committee on their inquiry into support for carers. One of the parents speaking in parliament was Nikki, who lives with her husband and two daughters - Heidi aged five and Antonia aged fifteen. In this blog Nikki explains the challenge of struggling to get the right support.

Written by Contact at 17:11

A year on the campaign trail in 2017

Our head of policy, Una Summerson, outlines how this year we have helped families to take action for each other.

Written by Contact at 00:00

Caring More Than Most: Miriam, Isaac and Naomi

Miriam Gwynne from Lanarkshirein Scotland is mum to nine-year-old twins Isaac and Naomi, who both have very different disabilities. Isaac has severe Autism, is non-verbal and has global development delay. He has neurofibromatosis type 1, a brain tumour and a visual impairment. Naomi has severe anxiety, autism and an eating disorder. Miriam’s husband also has autism and neurofibromatosis type 1.

Written by Contact at 00:00

Caring More Than Most: Jennie and Ben

In this blog, mum Jennie talks about life with her five-year old son Ben, who has quadriplegic cerebral palsy and needs 24 hours a day, 1-1 care.

Written by Contact at 00:00