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Parent carers more likely to say care they provide affects their health

Tuesday 5th December 2017

Parent carers are more likely than other carers to say that the care they provide has affected their health. Nearly a third (31%) say it has made them depressed.

This is one of the headlines of our Caring More Than Most report, (download the executive summary [PDF]), published this week, which suggests disabled children and their families are at a significant disadvantage in many key aspects of life including their economic situation, health, employment and housing.

"At any given moment our situation could implode"

Jennie is mum to five-year-old Ben, who has quadriplegic cerebral palsy and needs 24 hours a day, 1-1 care.

Jennie says: "Ben's dad and I struggle with the 24-hour a day care and lack of sleep. It's crippling at times. The whole social care and health system for families like ours works on a system of crisis management. There's no forward thinking. We live with the constant feeling that at any given moment our situation could implode."

Read more about Jennie and Ben in their blog.

A fifth of parent carers unable to stay in work

Our Caring More Than Most research is conducted with the University of Leeds and analyses the country's largest available datasets, including the census.

We found:

  • 1 in 5 parent carers leave paid employment because they are unable to stay in work and maintain their caring responsibilities
  • Parent carers are more likely to say the care they provide has affected their health with nearly a third (31 per cent) saying that it had made them depressed
  • Parent carers are more likely to have financial difficulties compared to other carers (36% compared 21%)

When compared to other carers, parent carers are:

  • Twice as likely to care for 100+ hours a week (24% compared with 12%)
  • More likely to have financial difficulties (36% compared 21%)
  • More likely to report problems with their own health.

Caring More Than Most highlights a marked and unacceptable difference between the quality of life and opportunities available to disabled children and their families compared to those without disabilities.

Support our Caring More Than Most campaign

We are a charity, and our work to tackle the inequality faced by families with disabled children depends on donations from our generous supporters.

Help us stop this never-ending cycle of disadvantage. Make a donation to our Caring More than Most appeal.

 


You can read more about and download the full report on our research page.